Can a pinched nerve in the spine affect both legs and feet?

Anyone suffering from a pinched nerve in the spine knows that the symptoms of this condition can be both painful and uncomfortable. The frightening part about compressed cervical nerves is that they can affect the entire body, including the upper body as well as the entire lower body including localized areas such as the thighs, buttocks, feet or toes.

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Can a pinched nerve in the spine make my arm numb?

The simple answer is yes, a pinched nerve in the spine can cause arm numbness, along with other discomforting symptoms such as muscle weakness and pain. However, understanding how this numbing occurs can be an important first step in the treatment and recovery process.

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Does a pinched nerve in the spine make your arms feel numb?

A pinched nerve typically occurs as the result of many common spine conditions, including a herniated disc, ruptured disc or spondylosis. When the components of the spine, or the spine itself, move out of alignment, nerve roots in the spinal canal can become compressed. This compression can cause local and radiating pain in the back and may result in a tingling sensation, muscle weakness or even numbness in the extremities.

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What are the symptoms when you have a C5-C6 pinched nerve?

The human spine is categorized into five regions, the uppermost of which is the cervical curve. Comprised of seven vertebrae designated C-1 through C-7, these segments represent the bones of the neck. As with other sections of the spine, nerves in the cervical curve branch off from the spinal column and exit through small holes between the vertebrae called foramen. The nerve roots that thread out of the cervical spine carry impulses from the brain to the shoulders, arms, hands, neck and upper torso, including the muscles that control the breathing process.

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How long does it take a pinched nerve in the lower back to heal?

When damaged, different parts of the body heal at different rates, and nerves are no exception. A pinched nerve in the lower back can be the result of either a sudden injury or long-term compression due to a number of causes, including a herniated or bulging disc, bone spurs, spinal stenosis and a misaligned vertebra. Before any healing can occur, the underlying cause of the compression must first be eliminated. In cases where a pinched nerve is the result of a damaged disc, relief may come naturally as the disc slowly heals, allowing swollen tissue to shrink and retreat from the affected nerve. In other cases, more aggressive treatments may be required to eliminate the cause of nerve compression, including steroid injections and surgery.

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What are the symptoms for a pinched nerve at the L5 level?

The lower back is comprised of five vertebrae that are collectively referred to as the lumbar segment of the spine. Starting from the highest and working down, these vertebrae are designated L1 through L5. Since the lower back supports most of the body’s weight, the segments that make up the lumbar are the largest unfused vertebrae in the spinal column. Because the lumbar must be flexible in order to allow for a full range of motion, this area of the back can be particularly susceptible to degeneration. If the discs between vertebrae become inflamed or herniated, or the vertebrae themselves become misaligned, it can result in compression or pinching of the nerve roots that run between them.

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What are some treatment options for a pinched nerve in the neck?

Spinal nerves can become pinched as a result of a spinal column injury or one of a number of degenerative spine conditions, including spinal arthritis, herniated discs, bulging discs or spondylolisthesis. These conditions can cause pressure to be placed on a nerve, which in turn loses its ability to carry signals accurately to the body parts it corresponds with. As a result, people commonly experience symptoms such as pain, tingling and numbness in the areas affected by the pinched nerve.

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Causes of a pinched nerve in the lower back

There are several conditions, injuries and lifestyle factors that can contribute to the development of pinched spinal nerves. This is doubly true when referring to nerve compression in the lower back (or lumbar spine) — an area of the spine that is subject to near constant pressure from the upper body and is particularly susceptible to injury.

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Is your pinched nerve in the shoulder blade or the spine?

Pinched nerves are a very common condition that can happen anywhere in the body — lasting anywhere from minutes to years — and cause pain that is mild to severe. Also called nerve compression, this occurs when any part of the body, such as muscle, bone or connective tissue puts pressure on the tissue around a nerve in the central or peripheral nervous system. Parts of the body that bear a lot of weight and move a lot are most vulnerable to developing nerve compression.

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What causes a pinched nerve in the shoulder?

A pinched nerve in the shoulder could be caused by a number of things, but two common sources are injury to the shoulder blade and damage to the cervical spine (neck). Damage to the cervical spine could cause pain in the shoulder because the nerve roots in the neck send signals that travel to the brain and other areas of the body, like the shoulder, arm and hand.

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